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Herringbone floor price

Wednesday 15 December 2021

One of the most popular trends in living is a herringbone floor. A herringbone floor looks beautiful and chic. The name comes from the laying pattern, which looks like fish bone. A herringbone floor gives a room a classic and luxurious look and feel. It is also timeless. No wonder that this floor is loved by many people. Laying this floor is a skilled job and if you are not very handy it is wise to have this done by a professional. Are you curious about the costs for a herringbone floor? We give you an indication of the herringbone floor prices and tell you what to look out for.

Costs herringbone floor per m²

The costs for a herringbone floor depend on various components. We will go into these in more detail below. However, an estimate can be given for the price per square metre based on the material of the floor. If you do not want to spend a lot of money, a herringbone floor made of vinyl is the best solution. If you want a wooden floor but not the most expensive option, a laminate floor with herringbone pattern is cheaper than a solid wooden floor. We have listed the average costs below:

Herringbone type of floor costs per square metre

Herringbone floor type Costs per square metre
Vinyl floor 15-60 euro
Laminate floor 25-60 Euros
PVC floor 30-70 Euros
Solid wood floor 40-80 euro
*These are indicative prices based on jobs previously carried out. The final costs may differ from the invoice you receive from us.

Difference between herringbone and Hungarian point

When you start looking into laying a herringbone floor, you will soon see that there is another option, namely the Hungarian point. There is a difference between these two floors. A herringbone floor namely consists of all short planks that are laid both at an angle and at right angles. The result is a stepped pattern that resembles a herringbone. With a Hungarian point floor the planks are not laid at an angle, but sawn off at an angle. This results in strips of parallelograms that are delineated by straight lines. To the eye, a floor with a Hungarian point looks a little calmer than a floor with a herringbone pattern.